June // Travels, cat thiefs and living in a YA contemporary

Photo of me stood in woodland against a wood barrier overlooking a river

June…has been a busy one. By my standards, at least. To this anxiety ridden introvert who used to need as much time alone as she did around people, this month has been intense. To be honest, my scheduling still is intense, but maybe I’m getting used to it now.

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Where am I at? | A look on my 2018 goals so far

Photo of me smiling, looking off to the left

So we’re halfway through the year, eh? It took me way too long to realise this, though while it seems to have surprised most people, it sounds about right to me. So much has happened and changed since the beginning of the year that I couldn’t even predict, so the months seem like a full year to me already.

That being said, 6 months ago I unintentionally made myself some goals for this year. By now they’re usually long forgotten, brushed into the attic of my mind only to be tentatively brought out again next year with a guilt shrug of “I tried” when we all know I really, really didn’t. And as I said before when so much has already changed this year…well, I’m intrigued to see how things have gone. So let’s have a little look.

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Penguin Moderns: Part 2 | The one where things are lost

Three Penguin Moderns - Till September Petronella by Jean Rhys, Africa's Tarnished Name by Chinua Achebe and The Missing Girl by Shirley Jackson

Back in March I introduced this new mini-review series for the Penguin Modern Classics, a collection of tiny pocket-sized modern classics sold for just £1. Having quite a few of these, I decided to review them in groups of three – and today we finally have the second post, the one where things are lost. Somehow – despite choosing them in a completely random order – I’ve managed to find a common theme for each post so far (the first one being “the death episode”) and today’s is very much about what is lost in their story. So we have The Missing Girl, the lost thing in this book being pretty obvious, Africa’s Tarnished Name, discussing the lost culture and accurate representation of Africa, and Till September Petronella, following women who feel lost in their worlds. What you will find, however, is my thoughts on these books below…

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How Blogging Helped Me Deal With Grief

heart hand

So…we have a little something different today guys. Something more personal, written by a guest, and something I feel the need to help share.

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All These Beautiful Strangers by Elizabeth Klehfoth | Don’t let the rainbow cover deceive you

Inside cover of All These Beautiful Strangers by Elizabeth Klehfoth, photo for the book review

Goodreads | Book Depository

Don’t let the rainbow cover deceive you; this book is far from the happy-go-lucky story you might expect. Following Charlie Calloway in her Junior year at high school, things gradually begin to turn serious as she’s offered the chance to join secret – though dangerous – exclusive society, dubbing her as one of the elite. When things turn darker and a family secret is unexpectedly involved, the mystery needs to unravel for Charlie to know where she stands.

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April & May | Things are looking up (if “up” comes with a dose of “scary”)

A candid photo of me laughing, stood in front of a wall of flowers

April and May, what an intense couple of months you were.

April is barely a memory to me, this mind of mine having blanked the majority of it out due to sheer stress at all times. I know the facts: two essays to write – one of which being completely rewritten a few days before hand in – and an exam to revise for all in the same week. A summer placement to nervously apply for. Grades from previous essays coming back left right and centre. My brain feeling a constant pressure I attempted to keep at bay. But for the most part, it feels almost like April didn’t happen, this weird disconnection taking over and allowing me to run on autopilot. So there’s not much to say on that month (hence the lack of a monthly update back then).

Well, as stressful as April proved to be, I had plenty to look forward to going into May.

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Scythe by Neal Shusterman | Utopia has its problems…

Scythe

Goodreads | Book Depository •

In a world where natural death has been eradicated and immortality is a standard expectation from life, Citra and Rowan are chosen as apprentice scythes – scythes being professional killers chosen to keep the population at bay. Thrown into a morbid world forever testing their morals, we learn about this new world order as we watch the two train for the hardest job of their lives.

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Stratford-Upon-Avon // Visiting Ol’ Shakespeare

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Though not being the most prolific reader of Shakespeare, I couldn’t resist a trip to Stratford-Upon-Avon when offered. As always, my love for literature and history found themselves closely tied, and walking around what used to be a medieval market town fascinated me to no end.

The town itself is stunning, full of beamed buildings for even the most standard shops, something I was glad to see because lord, how I hate modern buildings in comparison. Quaint, cobblestoned streets bustling with people going about their day to day lives, we probably couldn’t help looking like the tourist types the locals are no doubt used to by now.

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Favourite university reads | What a mix of eras

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“Canonical writing is born of an originality fused with tradition.”

– Harold Bloom

At long last – but seemingly all too soon – I’ve reached the end of my first year at university. A long summer awaits, and so it’s time to bid farewell to the reading list of first year and anticipate the list for next year. But before doing so, the favourites of the bunch await their highlight.

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State of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury | Fantasy, politics, and a whole lot of grief

State of Sorrow

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A grief-stricken world void of colour and laughter. Stories that seem legendary, but were real eighteen years ago. A girl taking the chance she never realised she wanted. All of this – and more – you’ll find in State of Sorrow, and I guarantee you it’s worth the read.

Continue reading State of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury | Fantasy, politics, and a whole lot of grief