Favourite university reads | What a mix of eras

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“Canonical writing is born of an originality fused with tradition.”

– Harold Bloom

At long last – but seemingly all too soon – I’ve reached the end of my first year at university. A long summer awaits, and so it’s time to bid farewell to the reading list of first year and anticipate the list for next year. But before doing so, the favourites of the bunch await their highlight.

Continue reading Favourite university reads | What a mix of eras

State of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury | Fantasy, politics, and a whole lot of grief

State of Sorrow

Goodreads | Book Depository •

A grief-stricken world void of colour and laughter. Stories that seem legendary, but were real eighteen years ago. A girl taking the chance she never realised she wanted. All of this – and more – you’ll find in State of Sorrow, and I guarantee you it’s worth the read.

Continue reading State of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury | Fantasy, politics, and a whole lot of grief

March // It’s the little things…

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So, I came to write a March summary and thought…what do I write about? Because I didn’t do much that would typically be considered worth writing about. I had no events to speak of, no new plans to get excited about. It was just a month of uni work really.

But to me, March ended up being a month that meant the world to me, because it was full of all the little things.

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Penguin Moderns: Part 1 | Otherwise titled “The death episode”

Penguin Moderns

If you’ve followed me on any social media in the past month or so, you just *might* know how excited I’ve been about the new little Penguin Moderns. At £1 each, these tiny books seem to be a fab way of trying new authors or bumping up your Goodreads goal, or even – if you’re like me – giving yourself a tiny confidence boost as you still manage to finish a book within your busy schedule (even if it is only 50 pages long, but shh). And so after eagerly anticipating these gems, I promptly bought 4 of them the day of their release.

…And then went back and bought 3 more. Oops.

But having acquired a little collection, and with the likelihood of me buying more in the future, I thought I do a little review series for them. Since they’re so tiny, I’ll be combining together 3 mini reviews for each post, this first one covering The Vigilante by John Steinbeck, The Breakthrough by Daphne du Maurier, and Four Russian Short Stories by Gazdanov and Others. Without realising, they can all be connected with one common theme: Someone, at some point, dies in each of these lil books. We’re morbidly kicking things off with a death episode. Still, let’s chat books…

Continue reading Penguin Moderns: Part 1 | Otherwise titled “The death episode”

Strange The Dreamer by Laini Taylor | Dreams, gods, and a few (hundred) moths

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Goodreads | Amazon

The paperback from Strange The Dreamer is finally coming to the UK! *throws confetti* It’s been a long time coming, and at long last here we are. To celebrate, I’ve joined the Strange The Dreamer blog tour today, sharing my review from when I read this delight of a read and reminding you all that you should give it a go. In fact, I’ve reminded myself that I should reread it sometimes this year, especially with the second book Muse of Nightmares coming out later this year.

Anyway, enough rambling – onto the (spoiler free) review!

Continue reading Strange The Dreamer by Laini Taylor | Dreams, gods, and a few (hundred) moths

February // Birthdays, early screenings & the dreaded reading slump

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Where January proved to be the longest month in existence, February flashed by quicker than a blink (as I’m sure everyone has determined by now).

Honestly, it’s kind of a struggle thinking back over what happened this month, since it went by so quickly I barely had time to think. Or rather, I only had time to think about essays, which is a pretty standard thing by now. Despite working on things nonstop anyway, upcoming deadlines are always my cue to go into a sort of frenzy, not allowing myself to have a moment’s respite – which I know, is bad. But it can’t be helped. Even now as I’m writing this, my brain is gnawing away at itself with thoughts of “how DARE you not be doing uni work!”, thoughts that won’t be satisfied until I inevitably pick up some of my work after publishing this post. Still, at least I enjoy what I learn.

The coming deadlines also brought on a reading slump through February, though.

It very, very rarely happens to me. So when it does, it’s almost like my world tilts because what on earth do I do with my time?? I don’t spend my spare time reading, and all of my other hobbies revolve around the books I read so…what?

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Haworth ~ Bronte Country

I’ve wanted to visit the Bronte Parsonage for years. Though I’ve read a pitiful amount from the infamous Bronte sisters so far, the history and literature lovers inside me bound together and willed me go. And so after all those years of waiting, I went.

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‘…when the setting sun shone on it and the topmost heights, and the whole extent of landscape besides lay in shadow.’ {Emily Bronte}

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The City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty | Can I just *be* Nahri?

City of Brass

Goodreads | Book Depository •

Set on the streets of 18th century Cairo before plunging us into the world of Daevabad, this is a fantasy novel I’ve been eagerly anticipating for months. Following a conwoman called Nahri, we witness her healing tricks long before she admits to them being magical – that is, until she accidentally summons a (kind of) djinn warrior in the process. Which, to be fair, would convince me too.

Continue reading The City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty | Can I just *be* Nahri?

The books I gave a home, but not a read (yet)

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“How many books do you have on your shelves that are unread?” is probably a question that’s better left unanswered (although, I’ll have you know it’s not as many as I thought…it’s bad, but not as bad). And when it comes to my good old phrase of “I’ve been meaning to read this one for years!” you can guarantee I’m not exaggerating. But it had me thinking – which books have I been meaning to get round to the longest?

I actually loved doing this post and unearthing the lost treasures on my shelves. Not that they were ever hidden…they just became vastly overshadowed by at least 3 or 4 years worth of shiny new books (yikes). But since I log all the books I own on Goodreads, I managed to trace back the ones I’ve had on my shelves the longest quickly enough. And so here’s the books I gave a home to all those years ago, but have still yet to read…

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Force of Nature by Jane Harper | What happened to Alice?

Force of Nature

Goodreads | Amazon UK | Book Depository 

Today, my lovelies, I’m taking part in a blog tour! It’s been an awful long while since I’ve done one of these, but I couldn’t pass up the opportunity when I heard about this book. It caught my attention immediately, and with the need for mystery I’ve been feeling lately, it came at just the right time!

Set in the rainy bushland of the Giralang Ranges, this book follows a team of five women reluctantly sent out on a team building hike. What better way to build team spirit, right? Well, sure…apart from one of them doesn’t come back. Things go downhill real quick when Alice Russell disappears from the group and the rest of the women come back looking worn and disheveled, the situation calling for Aaron Faulk and a whole team of investigators to get involved.

Continue reading Force of Nature by Jane Harper | What happened to Alice?