Feminists Don’t Wear Pink (And Other Lies) // Oh The Many Thoughts

Feminists Don't Wear Pink (And Other Lies)

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Picking up this book, I had high expectations. It became an event, with me buddy reading this with my friend Jess and setting time aside in my hectic uni reading schedule to make sure I read it.

And then…eh. I don’t know what happened. I have many, many thoughts.

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The Lost Man by Jane Harper // Blog Tour

The Lost Man by Jane Harper - Blog Tour

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*Thank you to the publisher for sending me a free copy of this book in exchange for a review. This in no way affects my opinion.

Could you survive the desert-land of Australia? For one family, their livelihood depends on it. But when one brother is found dead with no apparent evidence as to how he came to be here, questions are raised as to whether the entire family can really be trusted…

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Something Like Breathing by Angela Readman // Took My Breath Away

Something Like Breathing by Angela Readman. Published by And Other Stories

*Thank you to the publisher for sending me a free copy of this book. This in no way affects my opinion of the book.

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A story of friendship, teenage years and a town that’s probably too small for its own good, this book follows Lorrie, unimpressed as her family move to a remote Scottish island. Thround choice or through happenstance, she becomes friends with the girl next door, Sylvie. But it doesn’t take long for her to wonder who Sylvie really is, what gift she’s hiding. and if she wants to be friends with her after all…

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Between Worlds: Folktales of Britain and Ireland // Did We Just Steal Other People’s Stories?

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Does Britain have its own set of folk and fairy tales? We hear so much more about the German classics, made famous by the Brothers Grimm. But believe it or not, they do exist, and Kevin Crossley-Holland has brought them into our modern day. 

Continue reading Between Worlds: Folktales of Britain and Ireland // Did We Just Steal Other People’s Stories?

City of Ghosts by Victoria Schwab |Perfectly placed but also… not

City of Ghosts by Victoria Schwab, also known as V.E. Schwab

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Imagine being able to see ghosts when your parents are ghost hunters (of a fashion). Helpful, right? Well…not so much. Cassidy Blake sees ghosts everywhere she goes, and she certainly doesn’t need to visit the most haunted places in Edinburgh to prove that. But of course that’s exactly what happens.

Continue reading City of Ghosts by Victoria Schwab |Perfectly placed but also… not

The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker |Telling a tale long lost in time

The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker - greek myth retelling

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The ancient stories are always male dominated, with women’s voices being pushed aside in favour of those “heroes” instead. Although let’s be real, my idea of what defines a hero definitely isn’t the type you find in many Greek myths. So imagine my excitement when finding out this book exists, giving another perspective – the women’s perspective – of the stories I’d read and loved before. Combining Homer’s The Iliad and The Trojan Women by Euripides, my anticipation for this book was REAL.

Probably more real than some of these guys’ “heroic” status.

Ohhh she said it. Continue reading The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker |Telling a tale long lost in time

Penguin Moderns: Part 2 | The one where things are lost

Three Penguin Moderns - Till September Petronella by Jean Rhys, Africa's Tarnished Name by Chinua Achebe and The Missing Girl by Shirley Jackson

Back in March I introduced this new mini-review series for the Penguin Modern Classics, a collection of tiny pocket-sized modern classics sold for just £1. Having quite a few of these, I decided to review them in groups of three – and today we finally have the second post, the one where things are lost. Somehow – despite choosing them in a completely random order – I’ve managed to find a common theme for each post so far (the first one being “the death episode”) and today’s is very much about what is lost in their story. So we have The Missing Girl, the lost thing in this book being pretty obvious, Africa’s Tarnished Name, discussing the lost culture and accurate representation of Africa, and Till September Petronella, following women who feel lost in their worlds. What you will find, however, is my thoughts on these books below…

Continue reading Penguin Moderns: Part 2 | The one where things are lost

All These Beautiful Strangers by Elizabeth Klehfoth | Don’t let the rainbow cover deceive you

Inside cover of All These Beautiful Strangers by Elizabeth Klehfoth, photo for the book review

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Don’t let the rainbow cover deceive you; this book is far from the happy-go-lucky story you might expect. Following Charlie Calloway in her Junior year at high school, things gradually begin to turn serious as she’s offered the chance to join secret – though dangerous – exclusive society, dubbing her as one of the elite. When things turn darker and a family secret is unexpectedly involved, the mystery needs to unravel for Charlie to know where she stands.

Continue reading All These Beautiful Strangers by Elizabeth Klehfoth | Don’t let the rainbow cover deceive you

Scythe by Neal Shusterman | Utopia has its problems…

Scythe

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In a world where natural death has been eradicated and immortality is a standard expectation from life, Citra and Rowan are chosen as apprentice scythes – scythes being professional killers chosen to keep the population at bay. Thrown into a morbid world forever testing their morals, we learn about this new world order as we watch the two train for the hardest job of their lives.

Continue reading Scythe by Neal Shusterman | Utopia has its problems…

State of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury | Fantasy, politics, and a whole lot of grief

State of Sorrow

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A grief-stricken world void of colour and laughter. Stories that seem legendary, but were real eighteen years ago. A girl taking the chance she never realised she wanted. All of this – and more – you’ll find in State of Sorrow, and I guarantee you it’s worth the read.

Continue reading State of Sorrow by Melinda Salisbury | Fantasy, politics, and a whole lot of grief